Shaping the Landscape: Clyde Walkway - Garrion Burn to Mauldslie Bridge

A gentle, meandering Clyde

Since the end of the last ice age less than 20,000 years ago, the erosive power of rivers have shaped the landscape. The present day River Clyde exhibits a wide range of channel types, from high energy, to bedrock floored streams and gently flowing, meandering, channels.

A great example of the Clyde meandering can be seen along the Clyde Walkway between Garrion Burn and Mauldslie Bridge – glimpses of it can be caught through the trees when driving along the A72 Clyde Valley Tourist Route.

A view of the meandering Clyde near Garrion Tower

In this area, the river flows between steep banks of silt, and during floods, fine sediment is deposited along the valley floor, forming the broad floodplain on the inner bend of the meander which provides valuable agricultural land.

The geological sites and features of the Clyde and Avon Valley tell a dramatic story of the development of the landscape over 400 million years, from ancient sandy streams, river deltas, swampy forests and glaciers. The rocks and rivers of this story shaped the heritage, and remain a source of power, havens for woodland and wildlife, and places of recreation and creative inspiration today.

Travel through time to reveal the hidden history in the rocks and landforms by exploring the other ‘Shaping the Landscape’ museum items below, and visiting the Shaping the Landscape Exhibition at New Lanark. Read the full report by clicking on the ‘Shaping our Landscape Trail Report’ link under ‘Find Out More’, or below. Whilst many ‘Shaping the Landscape’ sites are accessible to walkers, some sites are inaccessible, but featured as museum pieces to help demonstrate the development of the Clyde and Avon Valley.

 

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Shaping the Landscape Exhibition, New Lanark

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Shaping the Landscape: Black Hill and Stonebyres Quarry

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Hill formed from cooling magma providing great geological look out

Shaping the Landscape: Cartland Craigs & Cleghorn Glen

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A deep gorge, a castle and the highest bridge in inland Scotland

Shaping the Landscape: Chatelherault and the Avon Gorge

Shaping the Landscape: Chatelherault and the Avon Gorge

A quintessential part of the area's mining history

Shaping the Landscape: Lower Nethan Gorge

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Ancient river deltas and swampy forests

Shaping the Landscape: Morgan Glen & Millheugh to Fairholm

Shaping the Landscape: Morgan Glen & Millheugh to Fairholm

Subtle valleys exposing the stone through which the river cuts

Shaping the Landscape: RSPB Scotland Baron's Haugh

Shaping the Landscape: RSPB Scotland Baron's Haugh

Created by mining subsidence, now a haven for wildlife

Shaping the Landscape: Sampson's Slingstane and Fiddler Burn

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A mysterious boulder perched on a steep sandstone cliff

Shaping the Landscape: Stonebyres Falls

Shaping the Landscape: Stonebyres Falls

Giant rock steps over which the Clyde tumbles

Shaping the Landscape: Thank the Rocks for the Trains

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How geology led to the first local train lines

Shaping the Landscape: The Falls of Clyde

Shaping the Landscape: The Falls of Clyde

Dramatic falls show the power of ancient glaciers

Shaping the Landscape: The Nemphlar Channel

Shaping the Landscape: The Nemphlar Channel

An ancient dry valley formed during the last ice age

Shaping the Landscape: Threepwood Quarry

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Stoop and room workings to extract high quality sandstone

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